Why you should be writing a thank you email

Writing a “Thank You” email to an interviewer after an internship or job interview is one of the easiest yet impactful things you can do. Not only does it make you stand out against other job candidates, but it also gives you a chance to reiterate your interest in the role.

It sounds so simple, but you would be surprised at how many people don’t even do this!

Here are some tips to remember, to make sure you’re leaving an excellent impression:

  • Always get the names of each of your interviewers, and email them individually. Because you may be nervous, and forget each person’s name at the time of the interview, ask for a business card before you leave. This way, you’ll be sure to you get everything correct: names, spelling, and email addresses.
  • Keep the email brief, but be specific! In one or two sentences, reiterate why you’re interested in the role and why you are the best candidate. It’s always effective to refer to something that was said during the interview as well, because it shows you were engaged in the conversation and that you were listening.
  • This is a perfect time to demonstrate your writing and professional communication skills, so proof read your email before you send it! You don’t want the last impression you make with a potential employer to be an email full of spelling or grammar mistakes.
  • Timing is everything. Don’t wait more than 24 hours to send the email (the hiring process can move quickly sometimes) but don’t send it immediately after your interview (this shows you didn’t write a thoughtful, well-composed email). For example, if your interview was in the morning, send it later that afternoon.
  • Lastly, don’t copy and paste a “Thank You Email” template from Google and send it. Your email should not be generic, and instead should be thoughtful, showing your personality and your interest in the role.

Here’s an example of a great “Thank You” email.

Good Morning Tom,

Thank you very much for your time yesterday afternoon during my interview. I thoroughly enjoyed learning more about the Accounts Assistant role, and hearing you speak about your experience working on the team. From what you described, I feel that the fast-paced nature of the work is exactly what I am looking for, and I trust in my ability to learn quickly and jump into the role successfully. I especially would enjoy further developing my skills working in different Accounting software, and it would be exciting to learn Oracle with your team.

Please let me know if there is anything additional you need from me at this time. I look forward to hearing from you, and again, thank you very much for your time and for the opportunity to interview.

Sincerely,

Veronica Smith

 

Overall, a “Thank You” email will set you apart from the other candidates, and will demonstrate that you are serious about the role. It doesn’t take much time to put together – and this simple little act could make be the difference between receiving an offer, or a rejection.

By Ally Veneris

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